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    EXTRA CREDIT

     

    I love extra credit! That is, I love extra credit that is an application of skills we have practiced in class. Extra credit should be additional exposure to academic skills, never a purchase of Kleenex or simply a printout of an article. Extra credit should equal extra thinking. You must have all your other work done—even NON-GRADED homework assignments—before you are eligible to complete extra credit. Points awarded for each assignment is determined by the quality of your work.

    1. Memorize and recite a poem. I have a plethora of poems about reading and writing (see attachment in Google Classroom).  For each one you memorize and accurately recite, you will earn points.  The number of points depends on the length and difficulty of the poem.  You may do as many poems as you want.  You may also recite the same poem for the same amount of extra credit for each of the four quarters.

    2. Find a vocabulary word (or a form of the vocabulary word, such as "conveyance" and "convey") in your OWL book. Type a Google Doc with the MLA heading, the title of the book, the sentence the word was used in, and the page number. You also must include the information you need to memorize for the vocabulary quiz (i.e., the denotation, connotation, and part of speech of the word). If the part of speech is different (e.g., "conveyance" was a vocabulary word and is a noun, but "convey" is what you found in your OWL book and is a verb). Share the document with me through an email with the subject VOCABULARY EXTRA CREDIT.

    3. Find a literary term or an example of a literary term in your OWL book (e.g., parallel structure, repetition for effect, simile, metaphor, foreshadow, setting, alliteration, et cetera).  Type a Google Doc with the MLA heading, the title of the book, the sentence containing the literary device, and the page number.  In a paragraph, explain the effect of the literary term on you as the reader. Share the document with me through an email with the subject LITERARY TERM EXTRA CREDIT.

    4. Enjoy a movie related to the subject or theme we are studying (or have studied) in class.  You would need to write a reaction to receive the extra credit.  The reaction could be similar to the OWL book presentation (without the speaking element). For example, over winter break, you could watch It’s a Wonderful Life and prove George Bailey is an everyday hero because of his acts of self-sacrifice.

    5. Visit a museum related to the subject or theme we are studying (or have studied) in class.  You would need to write a reaction to receive the extra credit.


    6. Attend a play related to the subject or theme we are studying (or have studied) in class. You would need to write a reaction to receive the extra credit.

    7. Read aloud to a parent or guardian for your OWL homework. This will require you to make a copy of the OWL book tracking sheet that is on my Google Classroom and keep track of the amount of time you spend reading aloud each week.

    8. Have a parent or guardian read aloud to you for your OWL homework. This will require you to make a copy of the OWL book tracking sheet that is on my Google Classroom and keep track of the amount of time you spend being aloud to each week.

    9. Read extra OWL minutes during the week.  This will require you to make a copy of the OWL book tracking sheet that is on my Google Classroom and keep track of the amount of time beyond the one hour per week that you spend reading each week.

     
    10. Find errors in published works. Print out the error. This includes my errors (e.g., in emails or on my website)

    11. Read and take quizzes over this year's Rebecca Caudill booklist or Abe Lincoln booklist. The quizzes are not available until second semester, but the books can be read for some extra credit in first semester.


    Do you have an idea for #12?  If you have an idea that is not listed above, propose it; I might add it.  Proposals that have NOT been added involved washing my car and babysitting my children, so if those are your ideas, forget 'em.  Educational language arts proposals only, please!
    J