• Art (K-5)

    The goal of art education is for students to gain an appreciation of art, discover how art reflects past and present cultures, and learn art techniques and processes.  The art curriculum is designed as a cumulative process.  Over the five-year learning period, concepts and skills are developed from identification and recognition to complex application.  Succeeding levels build on previous learning.

    All students participating in full-day kindergarten through fifth grade will participate in art education. 

    The Illinois State Board of Education has adopted the Illinois Fine Arts Learning Standards. These standards are intended to reflect best practices and address the curricular areas of visual arts, music, theater, dance, and media arts. For more information about the Illinois Fine Arts Learning Standards visit: 

    www.isbe.net/Pages/Fine-Arts.aspx

  • Kindergarten: 

    • Develop art production abilities
    • Develop the senses of touch and sight
    • Explore the concepts of line, shape, and color
    • Learn to use and care for art tools and materials
    • Begin to explore art in its historical and cultural context
    • Connect art to the school, community, and daily life
    • Develop creativity and become visually literate
  • First Grade:

    • Art Elements
      • Line - Recognize a line; Discriminate between various types and sizes of lines; Recognize various line qualities (thick/thin); Recognize that connecting lines create shapes
      • Shape - Recognize shapes of different types and sizes; Observe various shapes in the environment; Name basic geometric shapes
      • Color- Name primary and secondary colors; Recognize black, white and gray
      • Texture - Discover that texture is a surface quality related to touch; Develop awareness of a variety of textures
      • Space - Observe two-dimensional space in the environment; Observe three-dimensional space in the environment
      • Balance - Observe symmetry
      • Pattern - Recognize that pattern is created by repetition
      • Contrast - Observe contrasting qualities (large/small, winter/summer)
    • Art Production
      • Students will explore production techniques using the following media:  pencil, crayon, marker, watercolor, and tempera painting
      • Students will demonstrate ongoing care of tools and materials
      • Students will identify drawing and painting tools
      • Students will explore two-dimensional art in the media of paper and three-dimensional art in the medium of paper and/or clay
    • Art History, Criticism, and Aesthetics
      • Students will become acquainted with significant works by Georgia O'Keefe and Piet Mondrian
      • Students will look at two artworks of the same subject and discuss similarities and differences
      • Students will identify a portrait
      • Students will become aware of the similarities and differences between the visual arts, drama and dance
  • Third Grade: 

    • Art Elements
      • Line - Observe various qualities of line; Discriminate between various line types; Identify horizontal, vertical and diagonal lines in the environment and in artwork.
      • Shape - Discriminate between free-form and geometric shapes
      • Color - Become acquainted with the color wheel; Observe that the addition of white to a color creates a tint; Observe that the addition of black to a color creates a shade
      • Value - Discriminate between light and dark colors; Observe that value changes may occur by adding black or white to a color
      • Texture - Discriminate between varying textures
      • Space - Understand background as the part of a picture that appears farthest away; Recognize the horizon line in a work of art
      • Balance - Become aware of asymmetrical balance in the environment and in artwork
    • Art Production
      • Students will explore production techniques using the following media:  pencil, crayon, marker, chalk, watercolor, and tempera
      • Students will demonstrate ongoing care of tools and materials
      • Students will create:  a drawing, a painting, a pattern, a collage, two-dimensional paper project, and a three-dimensional artwork
      • Students will explore mixing secondary colors from two primary colors
      • Students will begin to know what is needed to produce quality artwork (good craftsmanship)
      • Students will continue to develop their art vocabulary
    • Art History, Criticism, and Aesthetics
      • Students will become acquainted with significant works by Vincent VanGogh and Faith Ringgold
      • Students will make informed responses to works of art and the environment, as well as justify opinions about the value of art
      • Students will identify a portrait, a landscape and a still life
      • Students will begin to discriminate between various media
      • Students will look at two artworks of the same subject and discuss similarities and differences
      • Students will continue to identify influences of daily life in selected artworks from various cultures
      • Students will explore the similarities and differences between the visual arts, drama and dance
  • Fifth Grade: 

    • Art Elements
      • Shape - Differentiate between geometric and free form shapes
      • Color - Continue color-mixing techniques; Identify a monochromatic color scheme; Recognize complementary colors
      • Value - Recognize that color values diminish with distance; Demonstrate shading of an object in a work of art
      • Texture - Define texture; Understand that texture may be actual or visual; Identify visual texture in a work of art
      • Form - Identify form as having three dimensions
      • Balance - Recognize and create an asymmetrical work of art; Observe and create radial balance in a visual image
      • Contrast - Create visual interest by using contrasting materials in an artwork
      • Rhythm - Recognize that rhythm can be created by repeating elements; Recognize that rhythm can communicate feeling; Continue observation of how rhythm in visual art is similar to rhythm in music
    • Art Production
      • Students will explore production techniques using the following media:  pencil, crayon, marker, oil pastels, chalk, watercolor, and tempera
      • Students will demonstrate ongoing care of tools and materials
      • Students will create:  a drawing, a painting, a pattern, a collage, a two-dimensional paper project and a three-dimensional artwork
      • Students will create tints and shades
      • Students will demonstrate the use of monochromatic color scheme
      • Students will begin to know what is needed to produce quality artwork (good craftsmanship)
      • Students will create a print
      • Students will demonstrate how various tools and media are used together
      • Students will demonstrate correct usage of basic art vocabulary
    • Art History, Criticism, and Aesthetics
      • Students will become acquainted with significant works by Pablo Picasso and Andy Warhol
      • Students will make informed responses to works of art and the environment as a result of their exposures to the art elements, art principles, and art history
      • Students will justify opinions about the value of art
      • Students will identify a portrait, a landscape and a still life
      • Students will explore the differences between a photograph and a painting
      • Students will begin to discriminate between various media, including photography, used to produce art
      • Students will continue to recognize universal themes in selected artwork
      • Students will continue to identify how art communicates similar ideas as other learning areas
      • Students will identify how a work of art tells a story about people and times
      • Students will begin to identify how visual art is created for a variety of purposes and reflects the time when it was created
      • Students will identify how works of art reflect the differences between past societies and present day life
  • Second Grade:

    • Art Elements
      • Line - Recognize that connecting lines create shapes; Understand that repeated lines form a pattern; Recognize a simple line pattern; Begin to recognize vertical, horizontal and diagonal lines.
      • Shape - Understand that repeated shapes form a pattern; Utilize shapes to form objects; Arrange shapes in order to express themselves objectively and/or non-objectively
      • Color - Identify the primary and secondary colors; Recognize warm and cool colors
      • Texture - Observe visual characteristics of texture; Describe the textural qualities of an object
      • Space - Recognize the overlapping shapes suggests depth; Recognize that distant objects appear smaller; Recognize a horizon line in the environment
      • Form - Identify a three-dimensional object
      • Balance - Create a symmetrically balanced artwork
      • Pattern - Identify a pattern in a work of art or in the environment; Create a pattern using two different shapes
    • Art Production
      • Students will explore production techniques using the following media:  pencil, crayon, marker, oil pastels, chalk, watercolor and tempera
      • Students will demonstrate ongoing care of tools and materials
      • Students will create a drawing, a painting, a pattern, a two-dimensional paper project, and a three-dimensional artwork
    • Art History, Criticism, and Aesthetics
      • Students will become acquainted with significant works by Gustav Klimt and Henri Rousseau
      • Students will make informed responses to works of art and the environment and will justify opinions about the value of art
      • Students will identify a portrait and a still life
      • Students will begin to identify influences on daily life in selected artworks from various cultures
      • Students will explore the similarities and differences between the visual arts, drama, and dance
  • Fourth Grade: 

    • Art Elements
      • Line - Observe that a line is a path of a moving point; Discover that line can create movement and direction in artworks
      • Shape - Identify geometric and free-form shapes; Recognize the difference between a two-dimensional shape and a three-dimensional shape
      • Color - Continue color-mixing techniques; Demonstrate how to create tint; Demonstrate how to create shade
      • Value - Recognize the concept of light and shadow in a work of art; Demonstrate a value change in a given medium
      • Texture - Define texture; Understand that texture may be actual or visual; Identify visual texture in a work of art
      • Space - Identify foreground and background in works of art; Become aware of the difference between positive and negative space in works of art
      • Balance - Identify a work of art that is asymmetrically balanced; Identify how the use of asymmetrical balance creates interest in artworks
      • Contrast - Observe that size differences in works of art can create contrast
      • Rhythm - Observe rhythm in artworks; Observe how rhythm in visual art is similar to music
    • Art Production
      • Students will explore production techniques using the following media:  pencil, crayon, marker, oil pastels, chalk, watercolor, and tempera
      • Students will demonstrate ongoing care of tools and materials
      • Students will create:  a drawing, a painting, a pattern, a collage, a two-dimensional paper project, and a three-dimensional artwork
      • Students will demonstrate color mixing as well as create tint and shade
      • Students will begin to know what is needed to produce quality artwork (good craftsmanship)
      • Students will explore and demonstrate paper manipulations
      • Students will create a print
      • Students will demonstrate how various tools and media are used together
      • Students will continue to develop their art vocabulary
      • Students will create simple weaving
    • Art History, Criticism, and Aesthetics
      • Students will become acquainted with significant works by Sonia Delauney and George Seurat
      • Students will make informed responses to works of art and the environment as well as justify opinions about the value of art
      • Students will identify a portrait, a landscape, and a still life
      • Students will begin to discriminate between various media
      • Students will begin to recognize universal themes in selected artwork
      • Students will begin to identify how art communicates similar ideas as other learning areas
      • Students will identify how a work of art tells a story about people and times
      • Students will begin to identify how visual art is created for a variety of purposes and reflects the time when it was created
  • Updated October 2019